Surprising Horizons

The Joy of Travel. The Realities of New Experiences.

Month: April 2016

Bite Size Review: Pigs Fly

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Update March 2017!! Pigs Fly have moved to Novena Gardens where Nickeldime used to be. Smaller venue. Will review it soon!! Nickeldime has moved to the strip mall next door.

“I want a food court where I can eat from a Japanese menu, Indian menu, Thai menu, a burger menu, a pizza menu, and a plain old bar snack menu. And I want to be able to pay for it up front so I can just waddle out of there after I stuff my face.”

“Yeah, right. When pigs fly…”

And so, I must imagine, went the conversations that led to the birth of Pigs Fly food ..place (it’s not exactly a court) in the Novena area of Singapore. Because that is exactly what you can experience if you happen to pop in to them.

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Japanese Chicken Curry with some broth. My fav.

It’s been my favourite go-to place for over a year now. I like getting rid of the hassle of flagging down a waiter, getting the bill, and then waiting for change or the credit card receipt. I like just getting up and leaving after shoving one last load of food in to my mouth.

Of course, the wide range of different cuisines is also a huge unique selling point. I wouldn’t know because I always get the Japanese chicken curry. It is fantastic; sweet with a little heat and the chicken is always succulent. But from seeing the other plates that are on offer it seems that good food is universal on the different menus.

Drinks wise you can get happy hour pints of Heineken or Tiger for $10 which is a great price for the area.

If I can think of any downsides it would be that if it gets really busy then the line up to order drinks and food at the bar can get long. We usually go early evening around 5 or 6pm and it’s usually reasonably quiet.

4.75 chicken cutlets out of 5.

Visiting Gardens By The Bay Singapore

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Unlike S.E.A. Aquarium I would highly recommend you buy your tickets online for Gardens by the Bay, print them out, and get them stamped at the turnstiles in to the two conservatories. Because they are actual tickets! Yes! The queues for tickets were horrendous when we went (Good Friday) so online tickets are a good thing.

It’s free to wander around the Gardens by the Bay park but it’s $20 for local residents to see two conservatories and $28 for horrible, yucky, non local tourists. That’s $8 extra for cleaning costs after you touch everything with your filthy hands. You can visit one conservatory at $12 if you’re a local and I haven’t a clue what it is if you’re a tourist. Probably $50. We went to see two.

First up was the Cloud Forest conservatory which is pretty impressive. It’s also pretty cold in there if you don’t like that sort of thing. You see, it’s replicating the climate of high altitude flora. Science. You take an elevator from the ground floor to the top and then work your way down. It’s pretty neat and has some walkways creeping out over the dome so if you’re afeared of heights you can skip that. Yeah, so that’s that one. Some nice things to see on the way down.

Next one is the Flower Dome conservatory. This was hell. There was too many people and the flowers were just not that interesting if you are being pushed and prodded from all angles. The Cherry Blossoms were in bloom but the walk through them was like wading through a tube of congealed human matter. Wasn’t fun. The blossoms weren’t even in the anticipated Japanese-esque vibrancy. Didn’t stop people stopping and taking selfies every ten seconds though. GET THE HELL OUTTA MY WAYYY!! *SOB*…

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We got out of there. It’s about 15/20 minute walk to Bayfront MRT (depending on how much energy and soul was sapped from you) to escape the madness.

So if you like flowers and stuff it’s a must see. If you want to just see an interesting attraction just pay to visit the Cloud Forest conservatory and take a wander around the park. And don’t visit on public holidays.

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Visiting S.E.A. Aquarium Singapore

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It’s always a good start when tourist attractions have tickets you can purchase online. Small alarm bells go off when said tickets aren’t actually tickets and you have to redeem them at the actual venue to get your actual tickets. Such it is with the S.E.A. Aquarium Singapore.

The confusion continued when I used the TICKET REDEMPTION machine at the Waterfront light rail station on Sentosa, got some green tickets out of it and proceeded to walk to the Aquarium. And then was proceeded to be told they weren’t tickets. A long jaunt back with the staff from the aquarium to the ticket counter and I get the correct tickets.
Me: “Why did the ticket redemption machine not give me actual, you know, tickets?”
Counter Victim: ” You need to read the back “Not to be given to guests”
Me: “My question still stands, why did the ticket redemption machine give me them then?”

Anyway it wasn’t his fault and we were soon in but, bloody hell, make online ticket purchases exactly that…ONLINE TICKET PURCHASES!

The S.E.A. Aquarium is very impressive. I had visited Kuala Lumpar and Chicago’s aquariums before but this one beats them hands down.

Large tanks for the big guys (sharks, mantas etc.) and the smaller tanks for..the smaller guys..are well displayed and lit. Just when you think you’ve seen the biggest tank you turn a corner and you reach this:

Other displays of note are the beautifully lit jellyfish tanks.

There was a dolphin in a tank but he was busy doing slave labour for the sake of tourist* entertainment in the arena above the aquarium.

I think it’s a must see for children and adults alike. It’s a little pricey at $32 for tourists and $28 for residents (don’t have to be permanent). I guess you can “buy” your tickets online but best to line up to see an actual human to redeem your tickets lest the ticket redemption machine feels like messing with the human overlords again.

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*I realise I’m a tourist too

 

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